Resources

Category: Youth Sector News

YEF TOOLKIT

Posted on 08/01/2022 in Youth Sector News

The Youth Endowment Fund’s Toolkit, a free online resource to help you put evidence of what works to prevent serious violence into action.

What is the Toolkit?

At the Youth Endowment Fund our mission is to prevent children and young people becoming involved in violence. We do this by finding out what works and building a movement to put this knowledge into practice – our Toolkit is one way we’ll do this.

The Toolkit summarises the best available research evidence about different approaches to preventing serious youth violence. It is based on real life data about what has happened when these approaches have been used before.

It provides insight on 17 different approaches, with more to be added in the future. For each approach it explains what it is, how effective it’s likely to be, how confident you can be in the evidence of its impact, as well as indicative costs and links to related resources and programmes.

Visit the website

BBC Young Reporters Podcast

Posted on 08/01/2022 in Youth Sector News , Community

Honest personal stories on what it’s like growing up in in the UK today, as told by BBC Young Reporters. Young people share their own stories in their own words, with authenticity and honesty.

Podcast

Key Stage 3 PSHE resource

Posted on 08/01/2022 in Resources for teachers , Youth Sector News

Aimed at Key Stage 3 learners, this resource is designed to equip students with the skills needed to make considered and informed choices about the content they watch.

BBFC has worked closely with the PSHE Association to create a resource that includes three lesson plans, a comprehensive teaching guide and extension activities allowing pupils to explore areas such as:

  • Representations of sex and relationships in films on and offline
  • Decision making and peer influence
  • How and why age ratings are given to films and other content
  • How the BBFC reflect public and teenager views when making those decisions
Website

Digital Youth Index for action

Posted on 08/01/2022 in Youth Sector News

The Nominet Digital Youth Index is a free-to-use national, annual benchmarking and barometer report identifying and monitoring the key drivers, issues and opportunities in young people’s relationship with digital technology across the UK.

The Nominet Digital Youth Index is a benchmarking report offering insight into young people’s digital experiences. What are the challenges and barriers they face? What do they love – and what do they worry about? Importantly, how can we help them harness the positive power that the digital world promises?

It’s the brainchild of Nominet’s Social Impact Programme and we’ll be gathering this data every year. It helps us – and you – to understand the digital lives of the young and identify the areas where we need to help them thrive.

Digital Youth Index Website Download the Nominet Digital Youth Index Report 2021

Young People’s Mental Health Priorities During and Beyond COVID-19

Posted on 16/12/2021 in Mental Health , YPF Webinars- Mental Health , Youth Sector News , Resources

In this webinar the CoRAY team share an up-to-date summary of the evidence base on how young people’s mental health and wellbeing has been affected by the pandemic.

Join the CoRAY team to hear what the latest research says about how the mental health and wellbeing of young people aged 11 – 16 years has been affected by the pandemic and what young people themselves are concerned about this summer.

In this webinar we share an up-to-date summary of the evidence base on how young people’s mental health and wellbeing has been affected by the pandemic.

Watch webinar

Five ways to make measurement of youth provision more meaningful

Posted on 16/12/2021 in Youth Sector News , Resources

The Centre for Youth Impact talks about how youth provision measurement can become a meaningful part of working with young people and what are the five ways to make it possible.

For many, matters of measurement in youth provision are a deeply contentious issue. However, I’d argue that, when done well, and in the right circumstances, measurement can become a meaningful part of working with young people that ‘goes with the grain’ of practice.

Over the past few years I’ve worked on two projects that are ambitious in the way they try to tackle the known issues in evaluating youth provision.

Read the full article

Girls' Attitudes Survey

Posted on 16/12/2021 in Youth Sector News , Community , Resources

Girlguiding asked over 2,000 girls aged 7 to 21 across the UK for their views on a range of areas across their lives. The results this year show girls’ and young women’s happiness has been in decline for over a decade, but the last three years have seen an acceleration in this trend.

This snapshot of the Girls' Attitudes Survey explores what girls have told us. And how you can use the Girlguiding programme and resources to build their confidence, develop new skills and improve their wellbeing.

Read the full survey

Exploring the absence of Black girls’ experiences of sexual abuse in research and practice

Posted on 16/12/2021 in Youth Sector News , Help for Young people and Parents

NSPCC spoke to Jahnine Davis, co-founder of Listen Up, about her work into exploring the lack of representation of Black girls’ experiences in research and child sexual abuse services, including suggestions to help improve practice.

We spoke to Jahnine Davis, co-founder of Listen Up, about her work into exploring the lack of representation of Black girls’ experiences in research and child sexual abuse services, including suggestions to help improve practice.

Ineke Houtenbos, a senior consultant with the NSPCC, and Jahnine discuss:

  • why the experiences of Black girls are missing from research and the impact on policy and practice
  • key findings from Jahnine’s research, including the experiences of participants
  • learning to improve practice and research
  • Jahnine’s experience as a Black woman embarking on this work.

This episode contains quotes from research participants about their experiences which might be upsetting and cause distress. If you need further support, please contact the NSPCC helpline or visit the Childline website.

Read the full article

Draw the line

Posted on 16/12/2021 in Youth Sector News , Help for Young people and Parents , Mental Health

Read stories about real relationships written by teens and draw a line through harmful behaviour. The platform is only designed for mobile devices.

Visit website

The online harms research

Posted on 16/12/2021 in Youth Sector News , Resources

Delivered by Catch22 and Redthread, The Social Switch Project is switching the narrative on how social media’s relationship to youth violence is understood, tackled and solved.

New research into the impact of COVID-19 on online harms revealed that more than two thirds of young people interviewed had seen content online that was either violent or explicit during lockdown. In light of the increased amount of time young people spent online during the pandemic to learn, socialise and for entertainment, London’s Violence Reduction Unit (VRU) commissioned an in-depth exploration of online harms, ‘acceptable’ use and regulation, that included the voices and experiences of young people, whose voices were missing from the body of existing research.

The Social Switch Project, a collaboration between charities Catch22 and Redthread, carried out interviews with vulnerable children and young people that use its services, frontline youth workers, police and tech platforms.

Research showed that 97 per cent of Catch22’s child sexual exploitation referrals have an online or social media element – with substantial increases related to online grooming and abuse. Consultation with young people also showed that more than 70 per cent of young people had seen content during lockdowns in 2020 and 2021 that was either violent or explicit, which included videos of suicide, nudity and extreme violence. They also described social media as ‘toxic’ and found it led to a negative impact on a young person’s mental health and wellbeing.

Young people cited unwanted contact online from adults, companies and bots, while there were also complaints of cyberbullying, threats and sharing of explicit content.

There were also examples cited of young people receiving responses a long time after a complaint, which caused them to relive the event or incident.

The data provides much-needed context on the wide-reaching implications of the pandemic and the need for services and training for professionals, parents and guardians during this time.

Further findings include:

  • Young people want to see better training for professionals and guardians in relation to online behaviour
  • Young people felt responsible to report content, but also felt the ‘damage’ had already been done
  • Children and young people want to see improved monitoring, swift action and accountability from tech organisations, rather than the responsibility being placed on the user
  • Police are ‘one step behind’ developments in technology and so need to develop stronger relationships with tech companies
  • As well as harms, young people highlighted significant benefits to their online world – in their education, their social lives and in their identity


Read the full report

NYA COVID-19 Guidance

Posted on 07/09/2021 in Member Updates , Youth Sector News , Community , COVID-19 Updates , COVID - 19 Information , News , News

On the 6th of September the NYA readiness level moved to green

The NYA readiness level is now green and international travel will once more be supported (subject to delay and FCDO advice)

All young people will be able to attend indoor or outdoor activities. Youth provision for young people of all ages, both under and over 18 years of age, have the same requirements.

To find out more download the NYA's guidance document on managing youth sector activities and spaces during Covid-19.

You can find helpful Covid-19 guidance on the NYA's website by clicking here.


NYA COVID 19 GUIDANCE

Impetus Leadership Academy

Posted on 13/07/2021 in

Youth funding and capacity building charity Impetus has partnered with Bank of America to launch a new training programme for aspiring leaders from ethnic minority backgrounds working in the UK youth sector.

The Impetus Leadership Academy aims to support the development of future leaders and their organisations, to contribute to the national conversation on issues facing young people from ethnic minority backgrounds, and ultimately improve the effectiveness of the sector. Building on Impetus’ training toolkit, the programme offers masterclasses on key leadership topics including financial and impact management, fundraising, and presentation skills and draws on input from experts working on issues of race in the workplace and in leadership. It is designed and delivered by people of colour for people of colour.

The course, which is fully funded for successful applicants, will be delivered as a mix of group sessions, mentoring and networking, running over the course of a year.

Recruitment is now underway for the first cohort of 12 participants – applications close 30 July; for eligibility criteria and information on how to apply visit https://www.impetus.org.uk/leadership-academy

Skills Exchange Project

Posted on 09/06/2021 in Youth Sector News , Community , Resources , Opportunities , Training , Employment

Skills Exchange Project are a non profit organisation who seek to guide and mentor at risk youngsters, by using the skills they already have. They aim to channel these young people into progressive and law abiding ventures and guide them into fulfilling areas in business, that they may not have known existed or had access to. Their services also include mentorship, personal finance and life skills.

Skills Exchange Project (S.E.P.) have experienced facilitators in Post 16 education with CELTA, PGCE and AET qualifications. They also have vast experience in FE colleges and Adult centre’s in and around London.

They have an ex city worker with an IAG certificate and ACSI accreditations from the Chartered Institute of Securities and Investments to guide our beneficiaries through the much demanded Introduction to Trading.

These workshops will be held several times a week. If demand increases then we will increase the frequency of the workshops.

The Skills Exchange Project are committed to giving mentorship and direction, providing workshops and surgeries to young offenders, at risk youth and young people from both the BAME and wider community.

To find out more and learn about their services click the button below.

Learn More

Kooth launches new service across all boroughs in North West London to offer digital mental health support to young people

Posted on 07/06/2021 in Youth Sector News , COVID-19 Updates , Help for Young people and Parents , News , Mental Health , Virtual Support

Kooth, a digital mental health platform, has been commissioned by The North West London Mental Health Collaborative to offer a new mental health service for children and young people aged between 11 and 25.

Kooth North West London service will ensure a single, consistent service offer for all boroughs in North West London. By extending its commissioning of Kooth, The North West London Collaborative is ensuring that all children and young adults in the area have a safe and confidential way to access timely emotional wellbeing and early intervention mental health support.

The pandemic has had a significant impact on the mental health of children and young adults in the UK, increasing the demand for digital mental health services. The recently published Kooth Pulse Report 2021 unearthed the effects COVID-19 has posed on society, giving a clearer picture of the issues that will need to be addressed now, and in the years ahead. Key findings from the study, include:

  • Kooth platform usage has increased by 42% amongst children and young people.
  • For our under-18 population who have presented with any issues, Kooth has seen a +39% increase in those presenting with suicidal thoughts and a +27% increase in those presenting with self-harm.
  • In 2020, Kooth handled +51% young people presenting with eating difficulties.
  • +54% increase in suicidal thoughts for 10-13 year olds
  • For Black, Asian and Non-White young people, there was a +83% increase in sleep difficulties, a +71% increase in school/college issues and a +25% increase in feelings of sadness.

Accredited by the British Association for Counselling and Psychotherapy (BACP), Kooth offers children and young people access to a full spectrum of digital mental health services. This includes peer-to-peer support for users via pre-moderated discussions and 24/7 access to curated self-help content, including a magazine with wellbeing articles, personal experiences and tips from other young adults and the Kooth team.

Young people can also drop-in or book live online ‘chats’ with experienced counsellors. The sessions are available 365 days a year, from midday until 10pm on weekdays and from 6pm until 10pm at the weekend and bank holidays.

Access is free of the typical barriers to support: no waiting lists, no thresholds, no cost and complete anonymity. The digital setting also helps to reduce the stigma traditionally associated with accessing mental health services. Kooth is available on desktop, mobile and tablet devices.

Learn more

Free dancing lessons for age 16-25

Posted on 01/06/2021 in Training , Community , Opportunities , Youth Sector News

Wac Arts is inviting those aged 16-25 for free dance training!

Announcing our guest Artistic Directors

Lukas McFarlane

Kloe Dean

Participants will get to try out what its like to be in the company and 15 dancers will be selected to receive 6 weeks of free dance training!

Please click the button for more information and how to book your taster lesson.

Learn More

Young People’s Foundations: raising the game for local collaboration

Posted on 28/05/2021 in

YPF Trust asked a group of independent consultants from the INTEN partnership, to look at the work of the Foundations both before and during COVID-19, and also to consider what the future might hold for their model of working with children and young people.

Read the full report here

Blog from the INTEN partnership.......

Five years ago, John Lyon’s Charity observed with dismay the decline of youth services in the London boroughs.

Years of austerity had taken their toll, and many local authorities had reduced or even withdrawn their support. Small local charities and community groups, at the forefront of work with children and young people, were in a desperate strait, with far too many going under. John Lyon’s Charity concluded that this just had to be addressed.

But how? The answer, it was believed, was to build afresh a local system of support. One that could encourage a positive spirit of collaboration among front-line organisations, and engage the local authority and businesses, and anyone else who could help. At the same time a method was needed to raise funds locally, and from further afield, and direct money where it could make the biggest difference to children and young people.

And so in 2015 the first Young People’s Foundations were established, in Brent, Barnet and Harrow. Others followed in Camden, Ealing, Hammersmith and Fulham, Westminster, and Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Outside London, Young Manchester was set up in 2017.

What have they achieved? YPF Trust asked us, a group of independent consultants, to look at the work of the Foundations both before and during COVID-19, and also to consider what the future might hold for their model of working with children and young people.

We were impressed by what we found. Each Young People’s Foundation is small (typically with three to five core staff) but together they have raised a total of £19.3 million for local work with children and young people. Of this over half (£9.8 million) is sourced from outside the specific local authority area.

In a few cases, notably in Westminster, some substantial resources have been raised from the private sector. However, elsewhere such efforts, while still worthwhile, have been less productive. A reflection of the woeful state of corporate social responsibility in this country, perhaps?

The Foundations’ good local knowledge has enabled the distribution of funds deep into the local community, reaching parts which have previously been overlooked, and where very frequently the need is greatest. They have often deployed funding in ways which have drawn on the resourcefulness of young people and their families, and involved young people directly in the funding decisions in creative and thoughtful ways.

Most importantly, the Young People’s Foundations have been able to win trust locally. Sometimes this did not happen straightaway. Initial suspicion of anything new is, after all, not uncommon. But, quite quickly, they built successful relationships at every level. In our view this was hugely helped by their founding principles that they do not compete with local front-line organisations and that they do not deliver direct services themselves.

Overall, the nine Young People’s Foundations have already brought together a total of over 1,200 organisations into collaborative local partnerships, driven by the perception that they can achieve more together than by acting alone. Around 500 of these are small local charities and community groups, working at the front line with children and young people, and including for example supplementary schools, which have been largely neglected by ‘mainstream’ organisations.

During COVID-19, the pool of existing relationships established by each Foundation triggered fast and effective actions, helping local agencies across sectors come together in the interests of children and young people and their families. For example, the Young Barnet Foundation, partnering with Inclusion Barnet and Volunteering Barnet as ‘Barnet Together’, was highly instrumental in setting up a local COVID Response Taskforce. Working closely with Barnet Council, Barnet Together co-ordinated food banks, meals delivery, and shopping collection services, to help isolated people, families and children at risk across the borough.

We were struck by the commitment of all the Foundations to understand and respond to local needs. For example in 2018, Young Harrow Foundation carried out an assessment of the needs of local young people aged 10-21. This was a coordinated effort involving 51 charities, Harrow Council, Harrow Youth Parliament, 24 trained youth peer leaders, 8 schools and colleges, and 30 community volunteers. This exercise alone collected the views of 4,358 young people, a figure any market research company would be proud of!

In all of this, we noted the cultural diversity within the Foundations, and their deliberate efforts to reflect the communities in which they operate. For example, across the nine organisations, 39% of trustees and 47% of staff are from BAME backgrounds.

In many ways all this represents a flying start for this model of local collaboration. Certainly, credit is due to some enlightened funders, notably John Lyon’s Charity and the City Bridge Trust, who have provided core funding, and also the local authorities that have embraced the opportunity.

If the network expands to other places around the country there will of course be some challenges, for example to sustain the integrity of the model, to attract the modest levels of core funding which make this way of working so much easier, and to build on – and not displace - valuable existing activity.

At a time when young people’s health, well-being, and future prospects are under pressure as never before, and when we are also seeing renewed (and long overdue) appreciation of the benefits of social infrastructure, replication and roll-out of the Young People’s Foundation model is well worth considering.